*not* the Arms of the Kingdom of An Tir
The Page's Herald
Ancient Letter of the Kindergarten of Heralds of An Tir
 

Volume 11, Bass 10, Treble 4 ~ April 1, 2003


 



Table of Contents:


Legs of Tony da Boid Greetings Unto the Kindergarten From Tony da Boid:

We really don't have much  to say here, except don't eat Or snow, don't gorge yourself at feasts, and must all cats be tinctured purr-purr?








Yours In (DIS)-Service,
Tony da Boid, enforcer for the Godmother
Black on the top and Gold on the bottom, a fantastic sea-beastie holding a sword in alternating colours. 

THE AN TIR INTERNAL LETTER OF UNTENT
 

April 1, 2003
Don't bother sending thy comments



Unto François Leafy, Mari Birdy, Zenobia Wraparound and the members of the Peanut Gallery, greetings from Teceangl HOV.  Implicated n the compilation of this Letter are myself, Iago d'Erminator, Sebastian Fahrvergnügen, Francesca Ontherocks, David Electric 220V/50Hz, Fionnghuala Shortcake, Meadhbha Dragon's Wrist, Earc Mountain Hedge, and Wade Wandersaroundalot.

It is the intent of the An Tir College of Heralds to disavow any knowledge of the following:

1.  Acke Holycow

Name and Badge, New

Vert, a cow statant guardant argent spotted of the field.

Acke is found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, as a header spelling.  Bernard filiua Acke 1212.
Holycow is a constructed byname.  Eilert Ekwall, The Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names shows several names with the protheme Holy: Holybourne dating from 1167 'Holy stream', Holy Oakes showing Halyok 1396 'Holy oak', Holystone dating from 1242 'Holy stone', and Holywell dating from the early 13th century 'Holy well'.  Additionally Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, glosses Holyoak as "...from residence near a holy-oak or gospel-oak, an oak marking a parish boundary..."  Under Halifield the origin is speculated as, "...perhaps land belonging to the church."
Ekwall shows many placenames using cow as an element.  Cowbridge, Cowarne 'cow-house', Cowdale, Cowden 'pasture for cows', Cowfold, Cowhill, Cowley 'cows' pasture'.  These placenames date back to the Domesday Boke.
Therefore, we assert that Holycow is plausible as an English byname as either the keeper of the church's cow, or a dweller by/near/with the church's cow.
We realize that the SCA does not use of the field as a term of blazon, but honestly, it's just appropriate here.

2.  Anand Stutter

Name, New
Submitter wishes a masculine name but will say no more on the subject.  He is well known as a fighter of infallible timing.
Anand
is found in RRReaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, sub Annand:  Godefridus filius Anandi 1182.
Stutter is a header spelling in the same source, Thomas Stotere is dated 1327.  When queried about using a byname spelling dated to period, submitter was so eloquent in his plea that the College felt compelled to try for his preferred name.

3.  Asce Hardware

Name, New
The submitter would like a masculine name and is amenable to interchangeability of elements.
Asce is found under the header spelling Ace in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, dated 1213 as a given name.
Hardware is a header spelling in the same source.  Robert, Samuel Hardware 1551.

4.  Feran del Lea Neighebour Hood   
     name change from Peres le Parkere

Name Change and Device, New

Per saltire gules and argent.

The submitter desires a male name and cares most about the meaning "Feran from Lea, the neighbour who makes hoods". If this name is registered he would like his old name to become a secret identity.  The submitter found documentation for the name elements on the Web (he's apparently very fond of webs), but we managed to find better sources for them.
Feran is found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of  English Surnames, 3rd edition, p.163 sub Farrand, "Herebertus filius Feran 1198 FF (Herts)".
del Lea is found in the same source p. 274 sub Lea, "Henry del Lea 1203 P (La)" with the meaning "From one of the many places named Lea".
Neighebour is found in the same source p. 320 sub Neighbour, "Bartholomew Neighebour 1327 SR (Ess)", with the meaning "neighbour".

5.  Golde Membyr

Name, New
Submitter wants a man's name.  He claims he wants a name from Holland, isn't that veird?
Golde is found under the header sperlling Gold in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of  English Surnames, 3rd edition.  Ralph filius Golde 1193, Golde Bassat 1279.
Membyr can be found in the same source under the header Membery, with Richard de Membri/de Membyr' dated 1201.

6.  Griffin Whiz

Name, New
The submitter desires a male name, and will accept no changes.  The submitter's device, Azure, a pale wavy and a base engrailed Or overall in chief a griffin passant gules, was returned in kingdom for breaking the rules of tincture and good taste.
Griffin is found in Morgan & Morgan, Welsh Surnames, p. 102 sub Gruffudd, "Griffin ap Yerward, bishop of Bangor".
Whiz is found in the same source, p. 70 sub Chwith, "Scott Campaign 1326. Maddok Whiz".

7.  Horsa M'Nuir

Name and Device, New

Argent, a horse statant en arriers and in base three apples sable.

Horsa is found in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle, at http://www.englishheathenism.homestead.com/hengestandhorsa.html
M'Nuir is found in  Black's The Surnames of Scotland, page 541, under the heading MacNair.  "John M'Nuir from the Parish of S. Ninians, a covenanteer, was drowned off Orkney 1679 (Hannah, ii, page 253)."

8.  Hulk Mad

Name and Device, New

Or, a saltire irradiated vert and a chief gules.

The submitter desires a male name and will not accept changes; changes make him angry, and you wouldn't like him when he's angry.
Hulk is found in Morgan & Morgan, Welsh Surnames, p. 127 sub Hywel, "William ap David ap Hoell ap Hulk, late of Clyneoke" cited from an early 16th century source.
Mad is found in numerous places in the same source, eg. p. 54 sub Boly, "Mad ap y boly", p. 76 sub Cyfnerth, "Mad ap Kyfnerth", and p. 164 sub Meddyg, "Holl ap Je(uan) ap Mad feddig". 
The overall construction is supported by the article "A Simple Guide to Constructing 16th Century Welsh Names (in English Contexts)" by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (Heather Rose Jones), found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh16.html :"In contrast to the Welsh patronyms of previous centuries, the most typical pattern is for ap (son of) to be omitted. Thus, patronyms most typically appear to be simply two or three given names in a row"
The arms are close to "Bruce, former royal house of Scotland" (Important non-SCA arms): Or, a saltire and a chief gules, but we believe this is sufficiently different from the Bruce Banner with the tincture change to vert, and the irradiation.

9.  Lowdspeke, Barony of, for Harka Herald

Herald's Title, New
The branch name was registered once upon a time.  THEY WILL NOT ACCEPT CHANGES TO THIS NAME.  (What?)
This title is formed in accordance with RfS III.2.b.iii. which says heraldic titles may be drawn from surnames.  Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, s.n. Harker date Ralph Harka to 1479.

10. Mariana Ginger Loveye

Name and Badge, New

(Fieldless) A palm tree per fess Or and sable.

The submitter desires a female name and will accept any and all changes necessary to register the name (she does not want Laurel to cast away her name over something minor). 
Mariana cited as occuring 4 times in the article "16th-century Spanish Women's Names" by Elsbeth Anne Roth (Kathy Van Stone) on the web at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/spanish.html.
Ginger is found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, p. 192 sub Ginger, "Roger Ginger c1280 St Thomas (St) meaning either a dealer in ginger or a red-head.
Loveye is found in the same source, p. 286 sub Lovey, "Richard Loveye 1349 LLB F; John Loveye 1382 FFEss.
The badge is to be a joint badge with Thursten Gilligan le Skippere below.  If there is conflict they are willing to accept changes to the bottom tincture- the important part to them is keeping the "per fess Or".

11. Mocca Lawtye

Name, New
The only change the submitter will accept would be to make the name "a little more sweet".
Mocca can be found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition,, p. 312 sub Mocking, "Son of Mocca."  It seems to be an Old English form.
Lawtye is documented from the same source, p. 273 sub Lawtey, and dated 1613 in the submitted spelling. 

12. Orm Orton   

Name, New
All documentation for this name can be found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, ppg. 330-1.  Orm would be happy with Ordmar Orpyn, or Ord Orm, or Orm Orr, or Oram Organ or even Orum Ordyn of Ortyn.  After all that, if you think we're going to organize or orchestrate our orations additionally in order to ordinate onomastic originality or otherwise institute an organon into this ordeal, you're nuts.

13. Payne of Herteburn

Name and Device, New

Argent, a heart sable enflamed within a bordure rayonny gules.

The submitter was too busy comparing antacids to give any preferences.
Payne is found in E.G. Withycombe, The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names under the header spelling of Pagan and dated to 1249. 
Herteburn is found in Ekwall under the header spelling of Hartburn, East, with the spelling of Heretburna dated to 1190, ~burn dated to 1208-10.

14. Plonquet Plummere

Name and Device, New

Azure, a straight trumpet inverted and a base double enarched argent.

Plonquet is documented from "French Names from Two Thirteenth Century Chronicles" by Arval Benicoeur,
http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/crusades/crusadesHommes.html
Plummere is found on the website for the Richard III Society, Warkworthe Chronicle, Part II http://www.r3.org/bookcase/warkwort/worthii.html.  The following is a quote from the source:
And in the vi. yere of Kynge Edwarde regne, the Lorde Hungerforde was takene and behedede for hye treasoune at Salisbury. And in vij. yere (40) of Kynge Edwarde, Sere Thomas Cooke, Sere Jhon Plummere, knyght, and aldermenne of Londone, and Humfrey Haward and other aldermen were arested, and treasoune surmysed uppone them, wherof thei were acquyte, but thei lost grete goodes to the Kynge, to the valowe of xl. M{1} marke or more; and diverse tymes in dyverse places of Englonde, men were arestede for treasoune, and some werre putt to dethe, and some scaped.

15. Rangeholm, Shire of

Branch Name and Device, New

Or, six bison sable in base a laurel wreath and on a chief vert a deer and an antelope salient addorsed Or.

Oh give me a home, where the buffalo roam:
"[At the Huntington Library, in Pasadena, CA] there was there a Spanish book printed in 1560 which had a very large drawing of what was quite clearly an American Bison." (LoAR 8/91 p.14).
Where the deer, "And the antelope....play."  Where seldom is heard: 'A discouraging word'; and the skies are not cloudy. [all day]  Home, home, on the range.  Ekwall, ppg. 380 & 246.
Where the deer and the antelope, http://www.heraldryunlimited.com/world/monsters/queerest.htm#antelope, play.  Where seldom is heard a discouraging word.  And the skies are not cloudy all day.

16. Teceangl Bach, for Bus Lane   

Alternate Name, New
Submitter's name was registered in September of 1999.  This alternate name was suggested by colleagues who have little else to do than drive around and think about Teceangl's registered badge, (Fieldless) A mascle argent. 
Bus is a Russian masculine name dated 1207 in Paul Wickendon of Thanet's A Dictionary of Period Russian Names, 2nd ed., found as a header spelling.
Lane is a header spelling in Reaney, P.H. and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, with this spelling dated 1212, 1260, and 1292.
According to the January 2002 cover letter to the LoAR, Russian and English are registerable in the same name as "a weirdness", which suits this submitter just fine, thank you.

17. Thursten Gilligan le Skippere

Name and Badge, New

(Fieldless) A palm tree per fess Or and sable.

The submitter desires a male name. We tried to ask him if he accepted changes, but he was too busy hitting himself with his hat while counting his money.
Thurston is found in Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of  English Surnames, 3rd edition, p. 446 sub Thurstan, "Turstin (Thursten) 1086 ICC (C); Thurstanus, Turstan c1095 Bury (Sf)"
Gilligan is a header spelling variang of Gillingham on p. 191 of the same source.
le Skippere is in the same source, p. 412 sub Skipper, "Geoffrey le Skippere 1285 Ass (Ess)"
The badge is to be a joint badge with Mariana Ginger Loveye above.  If there is conflict they are willing to accept changes to the bottom tincture- the important part to them is keeping the "per fess Or".


In service to An Tir,

Written by:
What?  You think that anyone would *admit* to writing this?!?

Arms of Tony da Boid HTML by:
Tony da Boid
If yous wants a piece of the action, come and sees me...
c/o Michael Dowd


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